Colin Robinson

One very important point you haven't mentioned... There are people in the Donbass region who are fighting alongside the Russian army, against the Ukrainian government forces.

From their point of view, the war did not start in February 2022. Their region has been under attack (and partially occupied) for the past eight years.

I know Ukraine and its allies say that the republics of Donetsk and Luhansk are not really countries. I've heard similar arguments from supporters of Israel regarding Palestine.

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I strongly agree that the world today faces problems that require global solidarity and cooperation.

Your quote from Alphonse de Lamartine reminded me of the final words of a hymn from India, the Annapūrṇā Stotra attributed to the sage Śaṅkara: "My homeland is the threefold world."

The nationalist right is one obstacle to what is needed. I'd suggest that another obstacle is the sort of multilateralism which divides the world into rival alliances, cultivating solidarity within each alliance but enmity between alliances.

I'm alarmed by the degree to which this is happening right now; all the more so because it's a temptation that pulls in people on the liberal side of politicals as well as those on the conservative side.

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I don't dispute your statement that the Folgore unit in Italy would take part in any fascist coup d'etat. The difference is that Ukraine has already had a coup, back in Febuary 2014. And neo-nazi paramilitaries took part in that, though they weren't then branding themselves as Azov.

Then there was the Azov behaviour at Zolote 2019, when Zelensky tried to begin a peace-making process. Public disobedience and open death threats from the Azovs forced the President to change his tune. These events were reported in the Kyiv Post and the Independent in UK, which are certainly not pro-Russian sources. Can you tell me when fascists in Italy last got away with behaviour like that?

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You characterise the current world situation as a systemic conflict between “fragile western democracies” and “totalitarian” Russian and China. That’s exactly what we were told during the Cold War, from the late 1940s to the early 1970s. (It became more compllicated after Nixon's trip to Beijing.) And I’m wondering whether you think western Cold Warriors got it right back then, when they championed Chiang Kaishek’s “Free China” against “Red China”? Or do you think that the narrative of democracy versus totalitarianism was wrong in those days, but is correct today?

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Colin Robinson

Colin Robinson

Someone who likes sharing factual information and fragments of the big picture